Here’s how startups are using AR to keep cyclists safe and informed

Augmented Reality (AR) is an interactive experience coupled with the overlay of digital information on everyday objects in the real world. From adding em

In short, it means blending the real-life environment – or the real world, as some like to call it – with a digital interface by putting virtual objects in real-time.

Augmented Reality: from art to language to cycling

From apps such as Google Lens that translate foreign text in real-time on your screen – even in Afrikaans! – to Google Maps incorporating AR directions in its app, it’s everywhere.

And I do mean everywhere. Acclaimed Australian artist Martina Martian uses the technology to create AR Effects on Instagram. She also incorporates her real-world art with AR. Here’s an example:

As reported by SparkAmplify, the AR market was valued at USD $4.21 billion in 2017. That value grew to USD $11.14 billion in 2018 and is expected to reach USD $60.55 billion by 2023.

Also read – The Lost Botanist creators become first South Africans to screen at top VR competition

Smart Glasses and Augmented Reality (AR)

One way augmented reality is making its mark in the cycling world is through AR glasses. These glasses make it possible for important information to be displayed in front of the cyclist’s eyes on their glasses.

ChaseWind is one such startup, and uses smart glasses to inform cyclists about their heart rate, gear, speed, and cadence (pedaling rate).

Chasewind’s AR glasses bring the head-up display (HUD) technology to cyclists. The prototype was on display at CES 2019. It features a transparent display of data that a user can clearly see in their field of vision.

With a HUD, you can keep your eyes on the road while accessing vital information through a specialised Bluetooth connector, which makes for safer riding.

GPS location and weather forecast information

In addition, the smart glasses can sync to your smartphone. By doing that, it will retrieve GPS information and, wait for it, display it right in front of your eyes.

Furthermore, it will provide weather forecasts, which would be especially useful for cyclists and hikers who regularly plan trips to mountainous areas where the weather can change suddenly. Or, you know, Cape Town.

The smart glasses also provide voice chat and SOS alert notification services, ensuring a safe experience for cyclists, as well as a camera that features facial recognition technology.

William Su is the co-founder and CEO of ChaseWind, which he established in 2016. According to Su, the product will be launched in Europe and the U.S. at a retail price of $500, or R7 400.

Watch: The ChaseWind Solution

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Source: https://www.thesouthafrican.com/

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